November 15th, 2009

Smile

He became a supervillain because his fellow professors made fun of his clothes.

Shortpacked!@TNI: Because we know they can't kill Bumblebee.
Shortpacked!: I'm so very, very sorry.

As promised, this is the Scarecrow that Sean Whitmore from ComicCritics.com sent me! (If you like Shortpacked!, ComicCritics! is a good comic to check out. It even has an exclamation point just like we do!)

Scarecrow's another one of those really old guys from the DC Superheroes line, the one which evolved into DC Universe Classics. But he's one of the articulated guys from that line (some weren't very much), so I totally wanted him for my Rogues Gallery. Yeah, he's got a lot of articulation. Short of a forward-back at the ribcage, he's got the same standard articulation everyone in DCUC has.

Though, I should note, he's sculpted into a pose, despite his wide range of movement. He stands naturally the way I've posed him for the photo on the right. One leg supports most of the weight, with the other intended to veer out to the side slightly. One leg's a little longer than the other, and the angle of the soles line up with this as well, so you're not really gonna be getting him into a straight-legged at-attention pose. Not that you'd require one for the Scarecrow, but it does merit mentioning.

He comes with two accessories: a fear gas bomb and a weapon that ends in both a scythe and a pitchfork. I'm afraid to remove the packaging rubberband that keeps his bomb in his left palm, 'cuz not only will I lose it, but I'm also not sure if it'll stay in there securely without the rubber band. And I'm happy to let him keep the bomb in his hand, so I'm fine not finding out. This is only a little unfortunate because his longer weapon looks like it'd look better if gripped in both hands. D'oh well.

Because DC Superheroes was basically Mattel's attempt to ape ToyBiz's Marvel Legends line, Scarecrow came with a comic book that featured him, just like early Marvel Legends figures. Scarecrow's comic book is a fairly contemporary (at the time, at least) Batman issue by Doug Moench and Kelley Jones. Sweeeeeeet.